Economy Education

Dear Graduate

Graduands at a past graduation ceremony Image courtesy MUST

Broad smiles are written on their faces during their degree’s conferment, optimistic that they would obtain well-paying white-collar jobs, live ostentatious lives and drive the classy cars of their dream. Apparently, it is the dream of every graduate to live a life of such social class which can be envied by everyone. They are oblivious of the unpredictable job market, desperation and frustration to fight.  Due to insatiable thirst for university education in Kenya, countless folks have crowded the institutions for bachelors, masters, doctorate and PhDs. Annually, 50,000 graduates from both public and private universities are piling into the jobless youths estimated at 2.3 Million. Research has it that only less than half is absorbed into the job market.

Dear graduates, don’t be enraged to hear buddies who attained lower division secured a job early enough before you. Probably they had a godfather ahead and this remains a key and crucial determinant factor here. People are using crafty means to get jobs because graft has evidently permeated into the job sector. Enter into a public office and you will get a vivid picture of this because diploma/certificate holders dominate the positions.

Don’t be confined to your course when applying for jobs lest you may tarmac for a decade or more. In addition, numerous graduates are working and growing in careers they didn’t qualify. To add salt to injury, the working experience employers are relentlessly demanding will thwart you out of interviews if you happen to be called for one. This is not to scare you, but preparing you psychologically before you encounter the bitter reality. Those from families engulfed in poverty may be compelled to do lowly jobs since they are not capable of bribing.

To wind up, the Commission for University Education (CUE) should embrace a curriculum that bakes more of job creators than job seekers to reduce the increasing number of idlers. The Public Service Commission must work round the clock to eradicate the escalating rate of corruption in job recruitment. This will play a pivotal role in rekindling the deteriorating hopes of university graduates. It looks awful when potential brains are rotting in villages due to scanty jobs. Finally, I urge graduates to develop entrepreneurial mentality in order to create jobs for others.

I wish you the very best in your future endeavors.

Mwania J. Nduku,

Meru University of Science and Technology.

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